Recipe makes 8 to 10 dessert portions

6 ounces Semisweet Chocolate Chips, 60% to 62% Cocoa

11 Tb. Butter, cut into small piecesMolten Style Chocolate Cake

1 ¼ cup Sugar

3 Eggs, beaten

1 tsp. Vanilla Extract

1/2 cup Pastry Flour

1 tsp. Ground Cinnamon

¼ tsp. Kosher Salt

Smoked Salt and Fresh Fruit for servin

Combine the chocolate and butter in a small saucepot and heat over a low stove setting. Whisk every 30 seconds as the butter melts to prevent scorching the chocolate. Once the mixture is completely melted and evenly blended remove the pan from the heat.

In a clean bowl whisk together the sugar, eggs and vanilla; whisk in the chocolate mixture until smooth.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cinnamon and salt. Fold the flour mixture into the chocolate base until batter is just incorporated.

Preheat the oven to 350F. Arrange 8 to 10 ramekins in a baking dish, or two baking dishes if needed. Evenly divide the chocolate batter between the ramekins. Place the pan holding the ramekins into the oven and bake for 12 to 16 minutes until the cakes are puffed and set around the edges but still soft, or “molten” in the center. Remove the cakes from the oven and transfer the ramekins to serving plates so that guests do not burn themselves on the hot ramekin. Sprinkle the smoked sea salt over each molten cake and top with some of the fresh fruit. Serve while warm if possible.

 

 

 

 

 

Recipe makes 4 to 6 entrée portionsFish Soup French

2 Sweet Onions, thinly sliced

2 Carrots, thinly sliced

4 Celery Ribs, thinly sliced

2 tsp. Granulated Garlic

28 oz. can Diced Tomatoes (Muir Glen is a great brand) OR 2 lbs. Fresh Tomatoes, diced

4 cups Vegetable Broth or Fish Stock

1 tsp. Kosher Salt

1 lb. Flavorful Potatoes, such as Fingerlings, Baby Rosas, Yukon Gold, Purples or Red Skins, small diced

1 & 1/2 cups Cooked Chickpeas (drained well if from a can)

1 lbs. Seasonal Fish, cut into bite size pieces, such as Snapper, Halibut, Flounder, Grouper or Corvina

Herb Aioli, recipe follows

Heat a large stockpot over medium high heat; when hot add a generous amount of oil to coat the bottom of the pot. Add the onions to the pot and sauté until golden brown, about 4 minutes. Add the carrot and celery to the pot and sauté until just barley tender, about 2 minutes. This trifecta of onions, carrots and celery are known as mirepoix and form the base of most French, and other European, recipes for soups, braises and stews.

Stir the granulated garlic into the pot and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add to the soup base the tomatoes and broth; season the soup at this point with the 1 teaspoon of kosher salt. A final seasoning with more salt will be done just before serving the soup.

Cover the pot and bring the soup to a simmer. Stir in the potatoes and chickpeas, reduce the heat on the stove to low, and recover the pot. Simmer the potatoes for 5 to 8 minutes until they are tender to the bite. Be sure the soup stays at a simmer and does not boil or you will end up with mashed potatoes in your soup.  Once the potatoes are perfectly tender but still hold their shape, stir the fish into the soup. Keep the heat on low, and recover the pot. Allow the fish to poach in the soup for 1 to 2 minutes; the fish will cook through very quickly when it is cut into small pieces and submerged in the hot broth so be careful not to over cook it. Taste the soup and add a little more sea salt as needed to season appropriately.

Ladle the soup into serving bowls and place a spoonful of the herb aioli in the center of each portion; guests can swirl the aioli into the soup as they eat to enrich the texture.

Herb Aioli

Recipe makes about 1 cup of Aioli

2 egg Yolk*

1 Tb. Dijon Mustard

Zest and Juice of 1 Lemon

¾ cup Olive Oil

2 Tb. Fresh Herbs, such as a mix of Basil, Mint, Parsley, Chives, Rosemary, Thyme or Tarragon

Place the egg yolks, Dijon and lemon juice in the small bowl of a food processor. With the motor running slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify the mayonnaise. Transfer this fresh mayonnaise sauce to a mixing bowl and stir in the herbs of your choice; season the sauce with sea salt to finish making it an aioli. Sauce can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

 

 

Recipe makes 4 portions

4 whole fish such as Snapper, Branzini, Pompano or Lionfish that have been gutted and scaled (your fish monger will take care of this upon request or they will already be prepared this way when displayed in the store.)lionfish cooked with salsa

Grapeseed Oil for sautéing the fish

Using heavy kitchen scissors carefully trim off the spines from along the dorsal fin of the lionfish. Cut 2 or 3 slashes into each side of the fish cutting through the meaty fillet and down to the bone. Opening up the fish meat to the exterior, but still keeping the fish whole, will allow the meat to cook more evenly when it is in the sauté pan. Season the outside of each fish with kosher salt.

Heat a wide, non-stick pan over medium high heat; when hot add a generous amount of oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Working with 2 fish at a time, place the whole fish into the hot oil. Sauté the fish without moving them for 2 to 3 minutes until the exterior is very crispy. Turn the fish over and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes on the second side. You can slice into the pre-cut slits in the side of the fish fillet to see if the meat is cooked all the way down to the bone. If the fish is cooked then remove it from the pan and place onto serving plates. If the fish is still a bit raw in the center then leave it in the pan, turn the heat under the pan down to low, and cover the sauté pan with a lid or flat pan of some type to trap the heat inside the pan. Leave the fish to cook for another 1 or 2 minutes and check again to see if it is ready. The larger the fish the long it will take to cook all the way through to the bone. Serve the salsa along side the sautéed whole fish.

 

Pineapple & Roasted Poblano Chile Salsa

2 Poblano or Banana Chiles

½ tsp. Grapeseed Oil

2 cups Fresh Pineapple, small diced

1 cup Fresh Tomato finely chopped OR canned tomato

Zest and Juice of 1 Lime

2 Scallions, finely chopped

¼ cup Cilantro Leaves, chopped

Coat the peppers with the ½ teaspoon oil. Roast the peppers on the grill or under the oven broiler until lightly charred evenly around the exterior. Move the peppers to a bowl and cover with plastic wrap; let cool for 10 minuets. Peel the charred skin off the peppers and discard. Working over a bowl to catch any juices, remove the stem and seeds from the pepper and discard. Finely chop the cleaned pepper and return to the bowl with the accumulated juice. Stir in the pineapple, tomato, lime zest, lime juice, scallions and cilantro; season the salsa with sea salt. Salsa can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

 

 

Select Wild OR Responsibly Farm Raised Salmons, or a blend of both!Salmon Chowder

Recipe makes 4 to 6 soup portions 

4 Celery Stalks, thinly sliced

1 Fennel Bulb, core removed and tough stems cut off and discarded; thinly slice the remaining fennel bulb

2 Leeks, white and pale greens only, thinly sliced

2 tsp. Granulated Garlic OR 2 cloves Fresh Garlic, thinly sliced

1 pound Yukon Gold Potatoes, peeled and small diced

3 cups Vegetable Broth or Fish Stock

10 oz. (bag) Frozen Sweet Corn or 2 cups Fresh Corn Kernels

1 pound Skinless Salmon, medium diced

½ cup Heavy Cream, optional

1/4 cup Parsley Leaves, chopped

Reserved Fennel Fronds if available, chopped

 

Heat a large pot over medium high heat; when hot add enough grapeseed oil to coat the bottom of the pot. Add the celery, fennel and leeks and sauté until tender, about 5 to 6 minutes. Add the garlic, potatoes and broth and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot and simmer the soup until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork. Stir in the corn and season lightly with sea salt and fresh pepper.

Transfer half of the soup to the container of a blender; place the lid on the container tightly. Using caution when blending hot liquids and starting on the lowest speed, puree the soup until smooth. Stir the puree back into the soup base and bring the entire soup to a simmer. Stir in the salmon, and the heavy cream if you are using it. Cover the pot and allow the salmon to poach in the hot soup for 1 or 2 minutes until the fish is just barely cooked through. Taste soup and season with sea salt and fresh pepper as needed.

Ladle the soup into serving bowls and garnish with the parsley and fennel.

TacoFor the Meat Filling

1 Pound Ground Grass Fed Bison, Pork, Beef or Lamb

2 Tb Taco Spice Mix (recipe follows)

1 tsp. Kosher Salt

Crispy Taco Shells and Chopped Lettuce for serving

Poblano Sour Cream Sauce (recipe follows)

Select a wide sauté pan to allow for plenty of surface area to spread out the meat. Heat the pan over medium high heat and add 2 tablespoons of grapeseed oil to coat the pan. Spread the meat out in a single layer of even thickness. Sprinkle the Taco Spice Mix and kosher salt on the topside of the meat to evenly coat. Allow the meat to sauté without moving it for at least 2 minutes. When the meat is browned nicely on the side in contact with the pan then use a spatula to break the meat up into small pieces. Sauté just until the meat is cooked through then remove from the pan right away to keep it moist.  Fill the crispy shells with the cooked meat and top with some of the lettuce & poblano sour cream sauce.

Taco Spice Mix

Recipe makes about ; store in an air tight container any unused mix for future Taco dinners

1 Tb. Ground Cumin

1 Tb. Dried Oregano

1 tsp. Dried Ground Chile such as Ancho or Chipotle

1 Tb. Granulated Garlic

1 Tb. Granulated Onion

Stir all ingredients together to evenly mix the spices.

 

Roasted Poblano & Cilantro Sour Cream

Recipe makes about 1 ½ cusp of sauce for 8 to 12 tacos

2 Poblano Chiles

½ tsp. Grapeseed Oil

1 cup Sour Cream

Zest and Juice of 1 Lime

2 Scallions, finely chopped

¼ cup Cilantro Leaves, chopped

Coat the peppers with the ½ teaspoon oil. Roast the peppers on the grill or under the oven broiler until lightly charred evenly around the exterior. Move the peppers to a bowl and cover with plastic wrap; let cool for 10 minuets. Peel the charred skin off the peppers and discard. Working over a bowl to catch any juices, remove the stem and seeds from the pepper and discard. Finely chop the cleaned pepper and return to the bowl with the accumulated juice. Stir in the remaining ingredients and season with sea salt.

Sauce can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

Flounder Mushroom Cilantro SauceRecipe makes about 1-½ cups of sauce, serves 4 to 6 portions to accompany a sautéed protein

1 Sweet Onion, small diced

2 Ribs of Celery, small diced

8 oz. Whole Fresh Shitake Mushrooms**, stems removed (weighed after removing the stems)

1 cup Vegetable Stock

2 tsp. Granulated Garlic or 2 cloves Fresh Garlic, minced

½ tsp. Kosher Salt

Zest & Juice of 1 Lime

2 Tb Fresh Cilantro Leaves, chopped

Heat a wide sauté pan over medium high heat; when hot add enough grapeseed oil to coat the pan. Add the onions to the pan and sauté until they are golden brown. Add the celery to the pan and sauté for 2 minutes until tender. Transfer half of this onion mixture to the container of a blender. Set the other half of the onion mixture aside in a clean saucepot. Return the same sauté pan to the stove over a medium heat setting and add a little oil to coat the pan. Add the mushrooms and sauté until they are wilted and tender, about 2 minutes. Stir in the stock, garlic and kosher salt; simmer mixture for 1 minute to reduce the liquid slightly. Add half of the mushroom mixture to the blender with the onions. Add the other half to the reserved onions in the saucepot.   Puree the accumulated mushrooms, onion, celery and broth in the blender to make a smooth textured sauce. Pour the pureed sauce into the saucepot with the reserved mushrooms, onion and celery. When ready to serve heat the sauce over low heat with the pot covered until the sauce is just steaming hot, do not boil the sauce. Stir in the lime zest and juice along with the cilantro. Season the sauce to taste with a little more sea salt if you like. Ladle sauce over your choice of sautéed or grilled protein. This sauce is also a good match for roasted vegetables or cooked legume.

**Other varieties of mushrooms can be substituted such as maitake, cremini, portabella or trumpet mushrooms.

Recipe makes 4 to 6 salad portionsHeirloom Tomato Salad Mimolette

1 pound Heirloom Tomatoes, cut into bite size pieces

Fresh Ground Black Pepper & Sea Salt as need to season the tomatoes

4 cups Mixed Salad Greens

Aged Sherry Vinaigrette, recipe follows

2 oz. Mimolette Cheese, thinly shaved with a peeler or grated

10 pitted Olives, sliced into rounds

Arrange the cut tomatoes on each serving plate leaving an empty space in the center.  Sprinkle the ground pepper and sea salt over the tomatoes to season them.

In a mixing bowl toss the salad greens with the sherry vinegar vinaigrette; divide the dressed salad greens between the salad plates nestling the greens in the center of the plate between the tomatoes.  Scatter some of the Mimolette cheese and olives over each salad and serve right away.

Aged Sherry Vinaigrette

¼ cup Aged Sherry Vinegar

1 Tb. Dijon Mustard

1 tsp. Honey or Agave Nectar

2 Tb Extra Virgin Olive Oil

½ tsp. each Sea Salt and Fresh Pepper

Whisk all ingredients together to blend. The vinaigrette can be kept refrigerated for up to 7 days.

Recipe makes 8 to 10 small plate portions OR 4 to 6 soup course portions

1 pound Leeks, the white, pale green and tender green sections thinly sliced (save the tough dark green leaves to use in making stock)

1 tsp. Granulated Garlic

1 tsp. Smoked Paprika

½ tsp. Kosher Salt

8 oz. Cooked Sweet or Spicy Italian Sausage, small diced

1 pound Fresh Tomatoes, diced OR a 15 oz. can Crushed Tomatoes (preferably Muir Glen brand)

2 cups Vegetable Stock

1 ½ cups Cooked Cannellini Beans (or a 15oz. can of beans, drained and rinsed)

2 Tb. Fresh Chives, Basil or Parsley, chopped for garnish

After slicing the leeks put them in a colander and wash them very well under running water to remove the sand and dirt that is easily trapped between the layers.  Drain the leeks well.

Heat a medium to large stock pot over medium high heat; when hot add enough grapeseed oil to coat the bottom of the pot. Add the leeks and sauté until they are tender and the greens have darkened in color.  The leeks will not turn brown like other onions do because of their very high moisture content.  Add the granulated garlic, paprika and salt to the onions and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir the sausage, tomatoes, stock and beans into the onions to make a thick soup. Bring the soup to a boil then cover the pot and reduce the heat to low. Simmer the soup for at least 5 minutes to blend the flavors. Taste the soup and season with more salt or pepper as needed.

Ladle the soup into small serving bowls or glasses and garnish with the fresh herb.

 

Recipe makes 6 to 8 portions

3 pounds Lamb Stew Meat (preferably grass fed meat) such as the shoulder or leg meat cut into 1-inch pieces

¼ cup or more Grapeseed Oil or Organic Vegetable Oil

2 Sweet Onions, thinly sliced

2 Tb. Apple Cider Vinegar or ¼ cup Beer

2 tsp. Dried Parsley

2 tsp. Dried Thyme

½ tsp. Kosher Salt

2 cups Beef or Vegetable Stock, plus more if needed to keep the stew moist while cooking

3 pounds Fingerling, Red or Yukon Potatoes, cut into bite size pieces

Chopped Chives or Parsley for garnish

Lamb Irish Stew Potato

Season the meat generously with kosher salt and fresh pepper.

Select a large pot with a tight fitting lid that will be appropriate for a long slow cooking time on the stove or in the oven. Heat the pot over medium high heat on the stove; when hot add enough grapeseed or vegetable oil to coat the pan. Place half of the meat into the hot pan leaving at least half and inch of space between each piece (**see note). Sear each piece of meat on two sides to a medium brown texture. Remove the meat to a bowl. Cook the second half of the meat in the same manner; add more oil to the pan if it seems too dry. Move this second batch of meat to the bowl with the first batch. Keep the heat on under the pan and add the onions. Sauté until the onions are browned and tender, about 2 minutes. Pour the vinegar or beer into the pan to deglaze; use a spatula to scrape the bottom of the pan to loosen any fond that has built up on the pan. Stir in the dried herbs, salt and stock; bring mixture to a simmer. Return the meat and any accumulated juices to the pot, nestle the meat into the sauce so it is partially submerged. Cover the pot with its lid at this point.

To continue cooking the stew on the stovetop, reduce the heat to low and plan for about 1 to 2 hours for the lamb to simmer for the meat to become very tender.

The covered pot can also be moved to the oven and cooked at 325F convection for about 2 hours.

For either cooking location be sure to check the meat every 30 minutes to stir things around and add more liquid if the mixture seems too dry. As the meat braises it will release a lot of its own liquid and the meat shrinks in size, so you may not have to add more liquid during the cooking process, but it is best to check at intervals just to be sure. Once the meat is very tender when pierced with a fork (but the meat pieces are still holding together, not falling apart) and the sauce has darkened in color the stew is just about ready. At this point add the potatoes to the pot and recover. Continue cooking the stew on the stovetop or in the oven as you were before. Once the potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork the stew is ready to be served; this will take between 12 and 20 minutes depending on which cooking medium you are using and type of potato you are cooking with. Taste the broth and add more sea salt if desired. Ladle the meat, potatoes and broth into serving bowls; garnish with the chopped parsley and serve.

**Leaving half an inch of space between the pieces of meat will allow for plenty of space for the steam to escape from the meat as it heats up. If steam is trapped between the pieces of meat it will boil the meat instead of searing it. Starting with a good sear – the dark brown crust that develops on the meat that is in contact with the pan – is essential to develop flavor for a braising recipe. The meat can be cooked in two batches for this initial searing step if the pan is too small to allow for adequate space between the pieces of meat.

 

 

Recipe makes 8 to 12 appetizer portionsCorn Soup Roasted

1 pound Frozen or Fresh Corn Kernels (measured when off the cob)

Preheat the oven to 425F convection. Spread the corn out on a baking sheet in a single layer. Roast the corn for 7 to 12 minutes until it is golden brown in color and the kernels have started to shrivel. Remove the corn from the oven; remove ½ cup of roasted corn kernels from the pan and reserve in a small bowl to use for garnish on the finished soup. Move the rest of the roasted corn into the canister of a high-powered blender.

2 cups Vegetable or Chicken Stock, warm or at room temperature, plus more as needed to thin the soup

1 tsp. Kosher Salt

2 Tb. Yogurt

2 tsp. Sriracha or other hot sauce

Zest and Juice of 1 Lime

2 tsp. Honey or Agave

Add the 2 cups stock and salt to the blender canister with the roasted corn; run the blender on high to puree the soup to a very smooth consistency. Move the soup to a saucepot and heat to a warm serving temperature over low heat. Add more stock as it might be needed to thin the soup to a thick but pourable texture.

In a small bowl whisk together the yogurt, Sriracha, lime and honey.

Pour the soup into appetizer sized serving bowls.

Drop a teaspoon of sauce onto the top of the soup; it should float on top of the soup if the texture is appropriately thick. Scatter some of the reserved roasted corn kernels over each portion and serve.

 

**For fun serving vessels you can use mini martini glasses, small glass bowls or sake cups. Guests can drink the soup right out of the vessel or use a demitasse spoon that is provided.